3-Step Programming Checklist

It’s important to grasp the principles critical to programming constantly varied, high-intensity, functional movements.
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programming checklist

It’s important to grasp the principles critical to programming constantly varied, high-intensity, functional movements while being inclusive of some less tangible polish. Implement these three oddly specific criterions when programming at your box:

Does this workout provide enough variance?

It’s key that we consider load, volume, structure, time domain to energy systems, movements, high skill vs. low skill, etc., for constantly varied training. You can write a thousand workouts with unique variables that all fall inside the same energy system (and therefore doesn’t provide enough variance).

Is this workout elegant?

It’s easy to be complicated. It’s easy to be cute. Elegance is a worthy pursuit in programming CrossFit workouts when a) they are effective, b) they demonstrate maturity and c) they keep the “magic in the movements.”

If your genius EMOM includes keeping track of your odd-minute reps until they match the even-minute prescription or your birth year or whichever comes first, you need to stop. Three rounds for time of 12 shoulder to overhead and a 400-meter run is still deathly effective (and doesn’t require a protractor).

Would you want to change the workout if your CrossFit idol pulled up in a limo unannounced?

Though this doesn’t provide any tangible checks and balances, it does pack an intangible punch. If Greg Glassman, Rich Froning or Brooke Ence crashed your affiliate and you felt compelled to erase the whiteboard, you might want to reconsider your programming. It’s my view that you ought to be able to go to bat for your final product.